From squeezing secular appeasements in the form of shaku-shaku and zanku into church proceedings to dramatic exaltations and prayer sessions, if you have nursed a single doubt about the viral hilarity of Chukwuemeka Ohanaemere, an Onitsha based clergyman, known widely as Prophet Odumeje the Lion, who has taken the internet by storm; then you haven’t really been paying attention.

Odumeje’s unorthodox method of preaching the gospel has continued to raise questions of his authenticity: “Is he really a man of God or is he just making merry? Was he an entertainer is his previous life?” These are recurrent questions as his Mountain of Holy Ghost Intervention Deliverance Ministry is fast becoming the home of your favorite South East Nollywood actors who appear to revere him, his non-conformist antics notwithstanding.

His words “I’m not a man of preaching of love, I’m a war, I’m a fight (sic)” give a direct ticket to who he is and what he represents. For someone who left a leather business for the work of God after a divine call for ministry, he is pretty intense and that is the magic that draws all these attention to him.

Indaboski’s seeming ruggedness and fearlessness expressed through his bombastic declarations characterized by his otherwise strong Igbo accent and miss-pronunciation of words (where letter R is used in place of L and seen when he pronounced coronavirus as “colonial vilus). That, however, has not prevented him from being unashamed of his sermons.

You would usually see Odemechi strut into his church amidst a collection of bodyguards, taking in adulation from the mesmerized congregation- many of whom have said that they are enamored with him because of his bold self-assuredness. With nicknames such as ‘the lion, ‘the fight’, ‘Indaboski Pahose’, ‘the liquid metal’, ‘Lebadu’, ‘radical plophet and ‘Seplae’, ‘fireman,’ he sings his own praises before anyone else, and more loudly to boot.

“I’m the one they call the liquid metal, the air that can be seen. Don’t you see it? Didn’t you hear? All the lion family, if it hits you, you give way so others can be hit. Don’t be stubborn when you’re touched. Give way so others can be touched as well.”

His unique way of preaching the gospel,with the integration of secular music and adoption of the Zanku dance during service, for a church, is unusual, to say the least. He lets his followers embellish him with cash while he makes his dramatic shows. Rappers who “make it rain” in strip clubs would be jealous of the weekly showers of various currency notes at Odumeje’s assembly. Less buoyant congregants simply look on in awe.

Critics have described him as a “money show maker” but he thinks of himself as a ‘coat of many colours’ and his critics, ‘noise makers.’

“I am not a man of story. I have evidences. When you say I am a show maker, then you bring to me your evidences that make you to be better than me. You’re just a noisemaker! I play but my joke is too dangelous. I smile but my smiling is too dangerlous. I am coat of many corours,” he says.